London fire: Sadiq Khan says tragedy caused by years of neglect

June 26, 2017

The Grenfell Tower fire was a “preventable accident” caused by “years of neglect” by the local council and successive governments, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has said.

After attending a service for victims, Mr Khan said the fire was a national disaster requiring a national response.

Kensington and Chelsea Council’s leader said officials had been working “around the clock” since the fire on Wednesday.

The government says all those who lost their homes are to receive £5,500.

Each household will receive at least £500 in cash and £5,000 paid into an account as part of a £5m emergency fund first announced on Friday.

At least 58 people are believed to have died after the fire ripped through the 24-storey block in North Kensington in the early hours of Wednesday.

Police are expected to announce an increase in that number on Monday.

The BBC understands about 70 may have died. Eighteen people remain in hospital, nine in critical care.

Widespread criticism

Metropolitan Police Commander Stuart Cundy said: “I must consider the fact that there may be others in the building who, for whatever reason, have not been reported to us.

“There is also a real possibility that there may be people in the building that no one knows are missing.”

Police have released images from inside the building to show the scale of the challenge they face.

Cdr Cundy said: “The conditions due to the fire damage verge on indescribable, which is why this will be such a lengthy operation taking weeks to complete.”

Inside of Grenfell TowerImage copyrightMETROPOLITAN POLICE
Image captionPolice have released new images of properties where everyone has been accounted for

Kensington and Chelsea Council has faced widespread criticism for its handling of the disaster, with residents complaining that officials had provided little support or information.

A group who met Prime Minister Theresa May at Downing Street have criticised the borough’s tenant management organisation for being “invisible in the aftermath of the tragedy”.

“We explained to the prime minister the anger of all residents towards the management of the estate over a long period of time, paving the way to this tragedy,” they said.

Mr Khan echoed their point, saying: “People are angry, not simply at the poor response in the days afterwards from the council and the government, but at the years of neglect from the council.

“There’s a feeling that the council and government don’t understand their concerns and don’t care.”

Lifts inside Grenfell TowerImage copyrightMETROPOLITAN POLICE
Image captionA police photo shows a burned-out corridor in Grenfell Tower

He added: “People in this community are sick to death of platitudes from politicians.”

Kensington and Chelsea Council leader Nicholas Paget-Brown said he understood residents’ anger and that the authority itself wanted to know why the fire had started and spread so quickly.

He added that the disaster was too big for one authority to handle alone and it was inaccurate to suggest his council was not present on the ground or working with other authorities.

Media captionCouncil leader Nicholas Paget-Brown says the council has a “very well organised” operation in place.

The government has sent in a team of civil servants to bolster the relief effort. They were spotted in high-visibility jackets in the area on Sunday afternoon.

Details of how the government’s £5m emergency fund have been outlined, including:

  • Funding will be made available for people staying in temporary accommodation
  • A discretionary fund is available to help meet funeral costs
  • There will also be funding for legal representation for residents involved in the public inquiry
  • An extra £1.5m will pay for mental health support for the emergency services

Mrs May said: “My government will continue to do absolutely everything possible to help all of those affected through the difficult days, weeks, months and years ahead.”

A newly-established “Grenfell Fire Response Team” has been set up to lead the relief effort, which will include a 24-hour operation at the Westway Sports Centre.

The new team is made up of local and central government, the Red Cross, the Metropolitan Police and the London Fire Brigade.

Media captionGrenfell Tower community applauded firefighters as they drove past

Eleanor Kelly, chief executive of Southwark Council, said speeding up the rehousing process would be the main priority.

The Red Cross has been asked to increase its role and and its staff will be part of teams allocated to every household affected by the fire, as well as meeting bereaved relatives as they arrive at airports.

The charity’s helpline – 0800 4589472 – is now the central point of contact for all people affected.

Mrs Kelly added in a statement: “There is nothing we can say that will blunt the feeling of loss and anger.

“But I hope the new team and this package of support will start to get those affected by this tragedy the urgent assistance from the authorities they need.”

Outside of Grenfell TowerImage copyrightMETROPOLITAN POLICE
Image captionThis police picture shows an entrance to the tower

Earlier, writing in the Observer, Mr Khan had suggested that high-rise tower blocks dating from the 1960s and 1970s could be torn down in the wake of the fire, which he said may well be the “defining outcome of this tragedy”.

Chancellor Philip Hammond told BBC’s Andrew Marr Show that a criminal investigation would examine whether building regulations had been breached when the block was refurbished.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn told ITV’s Peston on Sunday that the council had seemed to “lack the resources to deal with a crisis of this magnitude”, despite being the country’s “wealthiest borough”.

Floral tributes on Father's DayImage copyrightREUTERS
Image captionA Father’s Day card is left among bouquets of flowers in North Kensington

Meanwhile, Labour MP David Lammy, whose friend Khadija Saye is among the dead, has called for all documents relating to the refurbishment and management of Grenfell Tower to be protected.

Questions continue to be asked about why the fire spread so quickly, amid suggestions new cladding fitted during a recent overhaul could have been to blame.

The prime minister has come in for a barrage of criticism over her response to the disaster.

She was jeered on a visit to the North Kensington estate on Friday, and protesters marching on Friday and Saturday called for her resignation.

Grenfell Tower

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40320459

Cardiff fire: Blaze closes car park near Greyfriars Road

June 26, 2017

About 50 firefighters are tackling a car park blaze which has closed a busy road in Cardiff city centre.

The public has been asked to stay away from Greyfriars Road after the fire broke out on Crockherbtown Lane.

The blaze is believed to have started in a power sub station and involved industrial bins and Cardiff Bus has diverted all buses.

South Wales Fire and Rescue Service said a three-storey adjacent building had been “heavily smoked”.

Road cordoned offImage copyrightANGELA BATES/FACEBOOK
The fire

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-40407435

More high-rises fail fire safety tests

June 26, 2017

Cladding on 60 high-rise buildings across 25 local authority areas in England has failed fire safety tests, the government has said.

There are plans to test the fire resistance of cladding on up to 600 buildings following the Grenfell Tower fire in North Kensington on 14 June.

The Department for Communities and Local Government said all buildings examined so far had failed the test.

Councils were told to prioritise buildings they had most concern over.

Not all the buildings affected have so far been named but a list from the DCLG identifies 14 of the areas:

  • Camden – five buildings
  • Brent – one
  • Barnet – three
  • Hounslow – one
  • Islington – one
  • Lambeth – one
  • Wandsworth – two
  • Manchester – four
  • Norwich – one
  • Plymouth – three
  • Portsmouth – two
  • Doncaster – one
  • Sunderland – five
  • Stockton-on-Tees – three

Separately, cladding is to be removed from nine tower blocks in Salford, while Bootle said two buildings had cladding that failed tests.

The update came as Camden Council said it had told about 200 residents still refusing to vacate four of its tower blocks on the Chalcots estate that they “must leave” to allow improvement works to go ahead. The majority of the residents were evacuated on Friday night.

Firefighters had said they could not guarantee the safety of the buildings, which has cladding similar to Grenfell Tower where the fire is feared to have killed 79 people.

Camden Council leader Georgia Gould said officials would be visiting the residents still in their homes and continue to arrange temporary accommodation in hotels and other council properties.

She said there were “various legal routes that Camden Council could explore. However, we really don’t want to do this”.

She said: “Most of the residents are willing to go, they are just waiting for the right accommodation. They’re scared, they want to be sure that they can come back… the right approach is to work with them.”

Residents leaving Chalcots estateImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionResidents were told to leave four of the Chalcots Estate’s blocks on Friday

Chalcots was refurbished between 2006 and 2009 by the same firm, Rydon, that oversaw work at Grenfell Tower in 2015-16.

‘National disaster’

The government testing programme began on 21 June, with local authorities asked to submit cladding for examination.

Media captionMohammed Iskander shows us around the evacuation centre in Swiss Cottage

Speaking on BBC Radio 4’s The World This Weekend, Lord Kerslake, the former head of the civil service who who now chairs the Peabody housing association in London, called for the testing process to be accelerated.

“We are told they can do 100 a day – that should be the number they are meeting,” he said.

He added: “This is clearly a terrible national disaster and demands a national response. As well as the public inquiry on the lessons learned we need to establish where the areas of the highest risk are and take action immediately. That’s been a priority for me.”

The Local Government Association said some councils have introduced 24-hour warden patrols to mitigate the risk before cladding is removed.

It said in a statement: “Where cladding fails the test, this will not necessarily mean moving residents from tower blocks.

“In Camden, the decision to evacuate was based on fire inspectors’ concerns about a combination of other fire hazards together with the cladding.”

The LGA said it was advising councils still waiting for test results to prepare contingency plans “so they can take any measures needed quickly”.

Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40397790

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